Category: Services

PECO Preparedness

PECO Customers Reminded to Plan Ahead During National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness Month comes as the first major hurricane of the season made landfall in the U.S. this week, and the peak of Atlantic hurricane season is quickly approaching. The current weather patterns serve as a timely reminder for customers to be prepared for severe weather and other emergencies.

“The safety of our customers, communities, and employees is always our top priority,” said John McDonald, PECO senior vice president and COO. “We work throughout the year to ensure our employees and systems are ready for any extreme weather that may occur. Hurricane Dorian is a timely reminder for all of us that being prepared is a responsibility everyone should take seriously.”

To help customers plan and prepare for an emergency, PECO offers the following tips:

  • Stay far away from any storm damaged electrical equipment, especially downed wires. You should always assume downed wires are energized. Report a downed wire immediately by calling PECO at 1-800-841-4141.
  • Keep a flashlight with fresh batteries on each floor of your home.
  • Identify an alternate location for you and/or your family in case of an extended outage.
  • Customers who rely on electricity to keep medicine refrigerated or medical equipment running should develop a plan to maintain health requirements during a power outage.
  • Review the manufacturer’s instructions for safe operation of your generator. Do not connect a generator directly to your home’s wiring. Never use a generator indoors or in any enclosed area.
  • Follow the advice of local emergency management officials.

Read the complete press release here.

811

PECO Reminds Homeowners to Call 811 Before Digging

Saturday, August 11 (8/11) is National Call Before You Dig Day – a natural reminder for all customers and contractors to call 811 to have utility-owned underground lines marked before digging. Nationwide, every six minutes someone damages an underground utility line because of digging without first calling 811, according to the Common Ground Alliance, the national association that promotes the 811 phone number and safe digging practices.

Striking an underground electric or natural gas line can cause serious injury, damages and service interruptions. Every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants a call to 811. Installing a mailbox, building a deck, planting a tree and laying a patio are all examples of digging projects where a call to 811 should be one of the first steps. Customers and contractors also are required to call 811 before clearing blocked sewer lines to determine if any utility lines are nearby as well.

PECO has more than 9,000 circuit miles of underground electric lines, 13,000 miles of natural gas distribution and service lines, and another 9 miles of natural gas transmission lines buried throughout southeastern Pennsylvania. In addition to PECO’s lines, there are underground communications cables, water and sewer lines, and other utilities. Even properties that are not served by a particular service may still have utility lines running below ground.

When calling 811, customers and contractors are connected to PA One Call, the state’s coordinator for utility line marking. PA One Call will collect information about the project and provide it to PECO and other member utilities. The utilities will then mark their underground facilities. Calls are required at least three business days in advance of digging.

Once lines are located, customers and contractors doing work also must understand the markings and look for evidence of unmarked lines, such as water and sewer lines on private property. Sewer clean-outs and water valve covers are examples of equipment that can indicate the presence of underground lines.

For more information, visit peco.org/safety

trash

Rescheduled Trash Collection for Some Residents

Due to equipment problems, trash collection on the following blocks did not take place on Tuesday, July 30:

• 1000 block of Guenther Avenue
• 1000 block of Whitby Avenue
• 700 block of Fern Street

Collection on these three blocks has been rescheduled for the following day, Wednesday, July 31.

PA Real ID

REAL ID in Pennsylvania: What You Need to Know

Beginning October 1, 2020, Pennsylvanians will need a REAL ID-compliant driver’s license, photo ID card, or another form of federally-acceptable identification (such as a valid passport or military ID) to board a domestic commercial flight or enter a federal building or military installation that requires ID.

REAL IDs are now available to Pennsylvanians who want them. To help you decide if you need a REAL ID, and provide information on what documents you will need and steps you can take to get an optional REAL ID, visit the Pennsylvania REAL ID website.

Spotlight on the Spectrum

Yeadon Public Library Presents Spotlight on the Spectrum Program

The Spotlight on The Spectrum program serves as a peer group for children with developmental delays or sensory issues (Autism, Asperger’s and ADHD) and their parents, care takes and relatives. Please join us in the Yeadon Public Library community room, on Tuesday, April 2, 2019 at 7:00 pm.

Yeadon Public Library is a hub for the community and provides essential programs, workshops, activities and resources. The library now offers the same opportunities
for families living with autism; we are pleased to announce its sponsorship of the Spotlight on The Spectrum Program. The program will be held on every 3rd Saturday, 1:00pm-3:00pm

Spotlight on The Spectrum is a community grass roots program aimed to bring awareness to various forms of developmental delays or sensory issues (Autism, Asperger’s and ADHD). Spotlight on The Spectrum is designed to provide hope, inspiration, resources and education to parents, children and loved ones living with autism. The program gives attendees the opportunity to hear and interact with professionals, in the field and loved ones of those with autism.

For more information about this and other Yeadon Public Library programs visit yeadonlibrary.org, call 610-623-4090 or email librarydirector@yeadonborough.com.

Borough Offices Closed Wednesday, Feb. 20

Due to the expected winter storm today, Yeadon Borough Municipal Offices will be closed.

The William Penn School District is also closed today, Wednesday, February 20th.

Residents with emergency or acute needs should call 911. Please report power outages to PECO at 800-841-4141.

Heating Assistance Available

No Heat?

Contact the LIHEAP (Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program) No Heat Hotline: 610-447-3099 Option #4.
After Hours Emergency Number: 1-866-452-6152.

Also, contact the Office of Emergency Management at 610-623-2392 who will follow up with you.

Heat Advisory: County Heat Plan

Delaware County Heat Plan

Delaware County Council wants residents to know that the county’s Heat Plan is in place. Both the Office of Services for the Aging (COSA) and the county Office of Adult and Family Services offer assistance to elderly and vulnerable residents throughout the summer.

“We all love summer, but it’s important for our residents, particularly the elderly, young children and those with health challenges to say cool, stay hydrated and stay informed,” said Delaware County Council Chairman John P. McBlain. “The fact is that heat is dangerous, and it can kill, or cause heat stroke or heat exhaustion.”

Residents are urged to visit the county’s website to read the 2018 Heat Plan and learn about the resources the county provides. Residents should take precautions during heat waves and high humidity, to check in with the elderly and disabled family members and neighbors who are at greater risk for heat-related illnesses.

COSA’s Heat Plan includes a Heat Information Line, extended hours at Senior Centers, and educational information on heat safety tips, dehydration, and safe use of fans. COSA has purchased 250 cooling fans and 100 were donated by PECO, which will be delivered to the county’s eight senior centers for distribution to seniors needing cooling assistance.

“A fan creates air flow which helps the body evaporate sweat and cool down,” said McBlain. “We want to thank PECO for their generous donation of fans to our seniors this season.”

The Delaware County Heat Plan calls for senior centers and adult day care centers to extend their hours, to offer water and non-caffeinated beverages throughout the day, and to reinforce with service-provider drivers to check on consumers. Care managers are asked to identify “at risk” consumers who are homebound, living alone or have a prior history of inadequate cooling in their home.

It is also important to remember the safety of pets during the warmer, more humid months as animals respond differently to heat. “It’s not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet,” said McBlain. “If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly. Please also remember to not leave anyone in a car, including your pets and make sure they have plenty of water and shade.”

On any day when temperatures reach 90-degrees, it is especially important for young children and older adults, as well as people who have heart and breathing problems or are on certain medications, to pay close attention to what they are doing and how they feel during hot and humid weather.

People need to drink before they feel thirsty and if someone experiences signs of heat exhaustion, drinking water is not enough to reverse the symptoms. Individuals might need medical help.

COSA’s Heat Information Line at (610) 872-1558 is a recorded 24-hour phone service that runs June 1 through Sept. 30, providing residents with heat advisory updates and information. People who need additional assistance can contact a COSA’s Information and Assistance service at (610) 490-1300. For more information, and to read the county heat plan, visit www.co.delaware.pa.us.

Senior Centers

Chester Senior Center
721 Hayes Street
Chester, PA 19013
610-497-3550
Contact: Jamee Nowell-Smith
Hours: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Monday to Friday

Friendship Circle Senior Center
1515 Lansdowne Avenue
Darby, PA 19023
(610) 237-6222
http://www.scsdelco.org/centers/friendship.shtml

Good Neighbor Senior Center
1085 Hook Road
Sharon Hill, PA 19079
610-586-8170
Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30 am to 3:00 pm.
Evening and weekend programming on occasion, see calendar of events.
http://www.scsdelco.org/centers/neighbor.shtml

Havertown Senior Center
1105 Earlington Road
Havertown, PA 19083
Hours: Mon-Fri: 9:00AM-4:00PM
https://surreyservices.org/locations/havertown

Hometown Senior Center
302 S. Jackson Street
Media, PA 19063
Hours: Mon-Fri: 9:00AM-4:00PM
https://surreyservices.org/locations/media#overview

Schoolhouse Senior Center
600 Swarthmore Avenue
Folsom, PA 19033
Phone: 610-237-8100 ext. 30
Hours: Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
Evening and weekend programming on occasion, see calendar of events
http://www.scsdelco.org/centers/schoolhouse.shtml

Upper Darby Senior Center
326 Watkins Avenue
Upper Darby, PA 19082
610-734-7652
Contact: Michael Maloney
Hours: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday to Friday
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday

Wayne Senior Center
108 Station Road
Wayne, PA 19087
(610) 688-6246
Hours: 4p.m. to 6 p.m., Monday to Friday
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
http://wayneseniorcenter.com/

Don’t forget your Pet during a Heat Wave

Pets need extra care during extreme temperatures, as they cannot care for themselves. There are several measures that can be taken to alleviate the repercussions of heat on pets.

Never leave your pet in a parked car. On an 85 F day, the temperature in a car can reach 102F in ten minutes, and will continue to climb.

Watch for humidity. Humidity is very detrimental for pets. Dogs pant in order to release moisture from their lungs which acts as a cooling mechanism (since they don’t sweat). If there is too much moisture in the air, pets are unable to cool themselves properly. Take your dog’s temperature. If it is over 104 F, begin treatment for heat stroke.

Know the symptoms of heat stroke in your pet. Symptoms include heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, excessive thirst, lethargy, profuse salivation, a deep red or purple tongue, lack of coordination, and unconsciousness. To treat heat stroke, move them into a cool, shaded area. Apply ice packs or cold towels to head, neck, and chest and run cool water over them. Let them take small sips of water or eat ice cubes. Take them to the vet immediately.

Limit exercise on hot days: only take your pet in the early morning or evening hours to avoid the midday heat. Avoid asphalt as it can get very hot and burn your animal’s paws.

Give your pets water with ice cubes in it. Eating the ice cubes will help lower their body temperature.”